Different Tips to Win Social Security Disability

A percentage of individuals experiencing significant medical and/or mental ailments may not ever win their Social Security disability or SSI benefits. Unfortunately, it isn’t enough to have a severe impairment to win disability benefits from the social security management. Both Social Security disability programs (SSD and SSI) have rules and regulations that govern both handicap and non-medical impairment requirements that must be satisfied to be able to win Social Security or Supplemental Security Income.

Claims for Social Security Disability Insurance – which pays out $143 billion annually to more than 11 million Americans unable to work due to a serious illness or impairment – have been ticking upward. The Social Security Administration received nearly 2.7 million applications for the software in 2013, up from 1.9 million a decade earlier, according to its most recent annual report.

The rate of applicants who are ultimately approved, however, has remained slim – averaging just 36 percent for claims filed from 2004 to 2013, as stated by the report. About a quarter are given benefits on their initial claim, while another 2 percent are approved on 11 percent and appeal at hearings.

Request Appeal on Time

After every conclusion, you have only 60 days to submit your appeal in writing. If you wait more than 60 days to request an appeal, your appeal will most likely be dismissed. At the first three degrees of appeal (reconsideration, ALJ hearing, and Appeals Council review), you must file your appeal by submitting special forms. You can find these forms on the SSA website or by stopping by your local Social Security office.

Write an Appeals Letter

The Social Security forms for appealing a decision give you just several lines to write your explanation on why you think the choice was incorrect, but you should feel free to write the phrase “see attached page” on the form and submit a letter along with the form that carefully outlines the problems you see with the judgement.

The denial letter you received from the SSA that denied your eligibility for benefits will include an “explanation of determination,” which is sometimes called the “disability determination justification.”

This explanation of decision will include issues such as what sources the SSA used to assess your claim, why the SSA denied your claim, what handicaps the SSA assessed, and a description of your medical condition. If anything is incorrect or missing in your explanation of conclusion, include this in your letter to the SSA. Also submit any statements, records, or other information that makes your claim stronger.

Start Right Away

Don’t wait until your financial resources become tight. Success in your claim is based only on your handicap, not on how much money you have in the bank. In the event you need to request a hearing or appeal an unfavorable decision from the Social Security Administration applications can take over a year to process, and up to two years. You don’t have to deplete all of your assets to be able for Social Security disability. It’s possible for you to receive benefits from multiple sources at precisely the same time without affecting your Social Security Disability claim.

Record all your disabling symptoms and afflictions

Every symptom, physical or mental, may be related to your claim. Many medical impairments result in psychological strain, and often there are powerful emotional and mental components to disabling illnesses. If you are undergoing any type of mental strain or pressure following your disability, or if you’ve been diagnosed with depression or anxiety, document your mental state in your handicap notebook/journal.

Contact an attorney to help you file your claim

Attorneys who represent you to the Social Security Administration and Veteran’s Administration ordinarily are paid in the event you win an attorney fee that’s a portion of your benefits. This means that it doesn’t cost you any cash up front to get help in filing and asserting your claim. An attorney can assist you through the entire claim process from filing to appeal. They are trained and practiced at arguing your case in front of an administrative decision maker or before a judge in the hearing, collecting medical records and evaluations from medical providers, and navigating the complicated forms that have to be filled out. Legal counsel can even help you file an appeal if your claim is refused provided that you file an appeal in time.

Continue medical treatment for your disabling medical difficulties

It’s important that you just continue to receive and document the clinical treatment that you are receiving, even if you lose your medical insurance. Oftentimes, you can obtain free medical services through your local free clinic or regional hospital clinic. Ensure your doctor writes down your symptoms and problems, and explain to him how these symptoms affect your work throughout the house, your interactions with your family, and how you get around. These written records are critical to the eventual success of your claim. Without written records explaining how your functioning affects, you are going to be at a disadvantage when trying to establish your disability.

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